Sumry: the Resume Killer Will Help You Land Your Dream Job

Disclaimer: I was not asked by anyone to write about Sumry. I did it only because I like Sumry and its creators.

I’ve been an avid Sumry user for most of its life and writing about it is long overdue. Now that the new Sumry is live, I think it’s the right time to finally share my story. What’s Sumry? All you need to know for now is that if you hate resumes and CVs, you will relate!

I remember job hunting days, and I know you know how fun they are – NOT! I mean, keeping track of a dozen role-specific CVs and cover letters, and trying to keep them all up to date after every little project; and then trying to fit everything on one page of a Word document – because who has time for more, right? – with enough white space so it was less hideous, was at least a boring part time job itself!

Entered Sumry

I’m not just a tech lover, I’m an early adaptor too. In February 2014, I came across Sumry trying to design a better CV and signed up for a free account ’cause I liked the idea of having a different and eye catching resume. A few days later I decided I can afford buying Sumry a cup of coffee once a month for its lovely service, so I upgraded my account to Pro. Although I’m not actively looking for jobs now, I’m not planning on downgrading it. It’s useful and affordable; why would I give that up?

Joined Sumry Core Team

After using Sumry for a while and having a few conversations with Nate Hanson (Co-Founder of Sumry) about their product, I wrote a guest post for the old Sumry Blog around September 2014. Then, in November 2014, Nate asked me to join 19 other loyal Sumry users to form the core advisory team to help the main guys – Sebastian, Hayden, and Nate – shape the new Sumry, mostly through video chats, surveys, and beta testing.

What I Like About Sumry

One of the first things I loved about Sumry was its design. It was simple, elegant and user friendly – unlike many other resumes I had ever seen! But the best thing about Sumry was that it was so easy to keep up to date and edit – and still is. Adding points to my resume, moving them around and updating them was as easy as a drag-and-drop!

Sumry - Adding a New Point - by Behrouz Jafarnezhad - Perspective IX
Adding a New Point to Your Sumry

Also, using that little icon, you can add a bit of visual context to each point. Now, let’s move on to an even more important part of CVs.

Remember this?

References available upon request.

Ridiculous, isn’t it? I think, although Sumry hasn’t quite killed off resume just yet, it’s killed this little useless phrase on it! I mean, if you have references or recommendations you’d use them, wouldn’t you? (Of course, they wouldn’t fit on a smushed one-page Word document!) I believe, mostly from experience, nothing is better than a good recommendation when you’re trying to land a good job and Sumry helps you really show them off!

Sumry - Adding a New Reference - by Behrouz Jafarnezhad - Perspective IX
Adding a New Reference to Your Sumry

Real Humans Behind Resumes

I always thought resumes and CVs are way too impersonal, even when there’s no enforced template to adopt. I mean people are more than just a list of skills and work experiences or degrees.

Sumry - Fair Selection - by Behrouz Jafarnezhad - Perspective IX
Fair? Really?

I know this is about our education system, but I think it applies to recruitment processes as well, doesn’t it? Usually, on a one-page CV, there’s no room to show personality – unless it’s for a creative industry, then maybe!

Sumry’s emphasis on keeping everything simple and human is it’s main mission, which is an advantage to both the job seeker and the employer. Getting to know someone’s real character – as much as it’s possible online – and their values – which Sumry gives us the ability to show – will help the employers make better choices. And by the way, they will have Sumry Teams soon to help them with it too (maybe in the future, I’ll write about that too).

Another really cool feature that Sumry has is the Introduction. Basically, you can invite someone to view your Sumry profile with a personalised message for them to see when they visit you. This is a simple way to make introductions more real – you don’t introduce yourself to everyone in the same way, do you?

But how would you find someone you’d like to introduce yourself to? Of course, search is a great option next to referrals! And Sumry has a great search. You can search for a name, a city, a skill or even a hashtag!

In addition to introductions and search, Sumry has a little treat for you as well – it’s an email signature. I know it’s creating an email signature (even with a link) is not rocket science, but it’s good to have one linked to a page that shows our story.

Sumry Dashboard - Perspective IX
Sumry Dashboard

And last, but by no means least, is the Sumry dashboard. I waited for it for a long time, but you don’t have to. Sumry provides a simple, but useful, dashboard with basic stats, like the number of people who visited your profile during current week and the week before. Besides, it shows where the visitors have come from, whether they clicked on any of the links on your profile or not, and the average time they spent going through it. Plus, you can keep track of your introductions you’ve sent.

Oh, and one more thing – for more tech savvy readers – you can have your Sumry profile on a custom domain as your personal website or on a subdomain of your website.

Surprise!

I discussed this post with Nate, and got you – my awesome readers – a special deal! 15% off Sumry Pro if you use my special code! Subscribe below and I’ll send you the code 🙂

SPECIAL DISCOUNT

SPECIAL DISCOUNT

 

Subscribe and get 15% off on your Sumry PRO!

Only 20 codes available. Do not miss out!

Your code is on the way!

Let me know how Sumry worked out for you in the comments.

4 Comments Sumry: the Resume Killer Will Help You Land Your Dream Job

  1. Shane November 23, 2015 at 3:11 pm

    I think this is an interesting concept. I do like it in some ways but I think all of the traditional methods for measuring employability, ability and experience are just wrong.

    The landscape is changing and there are so many jobs around today that didn’t exist in the not too distant past.
    There needs to be a better way to measure people – for want of a better term.

    Reply
    1. Behrouz November 24, 2015 at 10:28 pm

      I agree with the fact that the traditional methods are not relevant anymore. In fact, the whole HR industry hasn’t changed much in a very long time.

      But I think you always need to show your skill and story somehow, specially if you’re a freelancer, and for that, Sumry provides a very nice platform.

      Reply
      1. Shane November 24, 2015 at 10:31 pm

        One thing that does come to mind is that people will remember images and visualizations long after a traditional resume so on that front it can certainly bring value IMO.

        Reply
        1. Behrouz November 24, 2015 at 10:34 pm

          Very good point. Another thing I really like about it, as I mentioned in the post, is that you can showcase your recommendations/references on it, with referees’ images (back to your point). To me, that’s invaluable.

          Reply

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *