Internet: You Always End Up Doing Something Else

 
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I believe the story is true, regardless of its being positive or negative. That we procrastinate on the internet is a proven fact, but I don’t think it is negative per se.

Procrastination on the Internet

A simple ad (not really likely though!), a message on Facebook, or a mention on Twitter, or any type of #notification in general can be a simple distraction while we are online. Although it usually leads to procrastination on the internet or the “Web of Distractions”, sometimes it can be a little spark, ending up in a new idea! Like when a friend sent me an infographic about different types of users on Social Media, and I started thinking that I can make one with the data collected for my MSc dissertation!

Although the odds of that happening is low, it’s not impossible. I myself use to-do lists & stickies (!) to stick to what I’m supposed to be doing. However, sometimes I let myself explore more! Explore the unrelated! This opens my mind to the issues I usually don’t care about, or even sometimes I don’t even know anything about to care about!

I believe that we should give ourselves some time to waste! We should give ourselves some space to do what’s not our daily routine! You might be thinking this is crazy, but give it a shot! If we stick to what we’re supposed to do, and keep doing it same-old way, we’ll miss what’s outside of the box and Creativity will be the casualty here!

Don’t get me wrong; I’m definitely against the waste of time, but I definitely am pro exploring new areas in our day to day life! Checking a new popular website, an unrelated trending topic can simply open our eyes to a world, which we sometimes don’t even know it’s out there! And who dares to say that knowledge, even briefly on an unrelated matter, is something we shouldn’t be proud of?

I believe keeping that wandering mind under control, and not being controlled by it, not only won’t damage us, but also will be the key to creativity. 

 

PS. the image is courtesy of John Atkinson, Wronghands